Thursday, February 6, 2020

No One Is Too Small to Make a Difference by Greta Thunberg - Kitabi Karwan Repost



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No One Is Too Small to Make a Difference by @gretathunberg Have you ever been slapped? Not play slapped, but smacked really hard. Right in the face. The kind that leaves an imprint? Imagine being told that you deserve it. Even worse, knowing deep down that you really do. That’s what this book is. At the outset, it is nothing but a collection of…frankly repetitive yet evocative speeches at multiple forums harping on the same point again and again and again. But there is something about them. Something in the deadweight, exhausted, exasperated yet slightly hopeful voice of a sixteen (now 18) year old. Something in that assertive yet pleading voice that reaches deep into you and squeezes every ounce of humanity from you, forcing you to face yourself. Climate change is real. Its effects are obvious and visible, and are exponentially getting worse. Yet, all we have are empty promises, half-hearted initiatives and talk of an optimistic future. It is something Peter Singer indirectly spoke about. While coming up with his seminal theory on global justice and addressing poverty he posited that humans are likely to help a person dying in front of them, but are somehow not motivated enough naturally to save the millions they don’t see suffering. He goes on to advocate a case that they should. I believe the same is happening right now, but the difference is that the millions are actually billions of young children who will be the generation to suffer through the present inaction. Secondly, the factor which mind numbingly is paradoxical is that this so-called “invisible” future generation is actually composed of people who the present generation espouses to love, care for and adore. I apologise for the crude parallel, but the actions of the present are tantamount to pushing people into a gas chamber, blissfully ignorant of what is happening. CONTD. IN COMMENT #audiobook #audiobooks #audible #penguinaudio #audibleindia #climatestrike #ParisAgreement #KyotoProtocol #earth #kitabikarvan #bookstagram #fridaysforfuture #penguinbooks #penguinrandomhouseaudio #nooneistoosmalltomakeadifference #gretathunberg #climatechange #globalwarming #ghg #greenearth #greenhousegas
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Have you ever been slapped? Not play slapped, but smacked really hard. Right in the face. The kind that leaves an imprint? Imagine being told that you deserve it. Even worse, knowing deep down that you really do. That’s what this book is. At the outset, it is nothing but a collection of…frankly repetitive yet evocative speeches at multiple forums harping on the same point again and again and again. But there is something about them. Something in the deadweight, exhausted, exasperated yet slightly hopeful voice of a sixteen (now 18) year old. Something in that assertive yet pleading voice that reaches deep into you and squeezes every ounce of humanity from you, forcing you to face yourself.

Climate change is real. Its effects are obvious and visible, and are exponentially getting worse. Yet, all we have are empty promises, half-hearted initiatives and talk of an optimistic future. It is something Peter Singer indirectly spoke about. While coming up with his seminal theory on global justice and addressing poverty he posited that humans are likely to help a person dying in front of them, but are somehow not motivated enough naturally to save the millions they don’t see suffering. He goes on to advocate a case that they should. I believe the same is happening right now, but the difference is that the millions are actually billions of young children who will be the generation to suffer through the present inaction. Secondly, the factor which mind numbingly is paradoxical is that this so-called “invisible” future generation is actually composed of people who the present generation espouses to love, care for and adore. I apologise for the crude parallel, but the actions of the present are tantamount to pushing people into a gas chamber, blissfully ignorant of what is happening.

This collection of speeches is not perfect. Greta has been widely criticised, and to an extent, rightly so, for not being, for a lack of a better term, pragmatic. She proposes no solution. She talks about inventions that haven’t been made yet or are impossible to implement on scale (yet). But that is something she, and no sixteen year old can ever be held guilty for. It simply isn’t her domain. No child should be held responsible for such a burden. After all, when you are drowning in the middle of the ocean miles away from the nearest coast, you won’t be asking for a boat or a ship or a floating device. You’ll scream, shout, fight, cry in agony…all for a breath of air. To survive. To live. That’s all Greta is saying. “I want to live. Please make sure I do”


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