Wednesday, December 4, 2019

Tuesday’s with Morrie by Mitch Albom - Kitabi Karwan Repost


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Tuesday’s with Morrie by Mitch Albom (@mitchalbom ) A multitude of metaphors are deployed for describing life, but rarely do we see life being seen as a lesson in itself. In an almost Kantian manner, Tuesday’s with Morrie is a beautiful book taking on life, as an end in itself. As someone on the brink of entering my late twenties, a book about life lessons by a dying professor to one of his students seems almost therapeutic...to the extent that it somehow predicates some, and probably all the errors I’ll make in life. As lovely as the lessons delivered by Morrie in a rather matter-of-factly manner are, I’m in somewhat of a conundrum. The first thought that crossed my mind after finishing the book was that poetically human beings only appreciate lessons only after taking the fall from incorrect decisions. At least a good chunk of them do anyway. Thus, any aphorisms (the new word I picked up from the book) about life are at best an effort to blunt the impact of the mistakes we’ll inevitably make. Personally, I’m not a fatalist or a pessimist, and I am a huge believer of books that help us improve our lives. But that being said, I stick by my original thought that often we end up making mistakes or taking decisions that strongly stand in the way dictated by these lessons. Then what role do these lessons play? I believe the lessons serve as reminders rather than guides, and prevent us from the trappings of the extremities of a pragmatic world. So yes, I’ll end up chasing a conventional career regardless of the number of people who tell me that a career won’t be what satisfies me the most. But I would like to believe that when it comes to choosing between my career and say family or friendship relations, I would always choose the latter, thanks to Morrie (and many others’) reminders. #reading #bookstgram #books #book #kitab #karvan #kitabikarvan #bookstagram #bookstagrammer #nonfiction #life #selfhelp #selfhelpbook #selfhelpbooks #hope #tuesdaythoughts #tuesdaypeople #tuesdaymotivation #tuesdayswithmorrie #mitchalbom #morrie #teacher #professor #lifelessons #lifelesson
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A multitude of metaphors are deployed for describing life, but rarely do we see life being seen as a lesson in itself. In an almost Kantian manner, Tuesday’s with Morrie is a beautiful book taking on life, as an end in itself. As someone on the brink of entering my late twenties, a book about life lessons by a dying professor to one of his students seems almost therapeutic...to the extent that it somehow predicates some, and probably all the errors I’ll make in life.
As lovely as the lessons delivered by Morrie in a rather matter-of-factly manner are, I’m in somewhat of a conundrum. The first thought that crossed my mind after finishing the book was that poetically human beings only appreciate lessons only after taking the fall from incorrect decisions. At least a good chunk of them do anyway. Thus, any aphorisms (the new word I picked up from the book) about life are at best an effort to blunt the impact of the mistakes we’ll inevitably make.


Personally, I’m not a fatalist or a pessimist, and I am a huge believer of books that help us improve our lives. But that being said, I stick by my original thought that often we end up making mistakes or taking decisions that strongly stand in the way dictated by these lessons. Then what role do these lessons play? I believe the lessons serve as reminders rather than guides, and prevent us from the trappings of the extremities of a pragmatic world. So yes, I’ll end up chasing a conventional career regardless of the number of people who tell me that a career won’t be what satisfies me the most. But I would like to believe that when it comes to choosing between my career and say family or friendship relations, I would always choose the latter, thanks to Morrie (and many others’) reminders.

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