Wednesday, December 4, 2019

Tuesday’s with Morrie by Mitch Albom - Kitabi Karwan Repost


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Tuesday’s with Morrie by Mitch Albom (@mitchalbom ) A multitude of metaphors are deployed for describing life, but rarely do we see life being seen as a lesson in itself. In an almost Kantian manner, Tuesday’s with Morrie is a beautiful book taking on life, as an end in itself. As someone on the brink of entering my late twenties, a book about life lessons by a dying professor to one of his students seems almost therapeutic...to the extent that it somehow predicates some, and probably all the errors I’ll make in life. As lovely as the lessons delivered by Morrie in a rather matter-of-factly manner are, I’m in somewhat of a conundrum. The first thought that crossed my mind after finishing the book was that poetically human beings only appreciate lessons only after taking the fall from incorrect decisions. At least a good chunk of them do anyway. Thus, any aphorisms (the new word I picked up from the book) about life are at best an effort to blunt the impact of the mistakes we’ll inevitably make. Personally, I’m not a fatalist or a pessimist, and I am a huge believer of books that help us improve our lives. But that being said, I stick by my original thought that often we end up making mistakes or taking decisions that strongly stand in the way dictated by these lessons. Then what role do these lessons play? I believe the lessons serve as reminders rather than guides, and prevent us from the trappings of the extremities of a pragmatic world. So yes, I’ll end up chasing a conventional career regardless of the number of people who tell me that a career won’t be what satisfies me the most. But I would like to believe that when it comes to choosing between my career and say family or friendship relations, I would always choose the latter, thanks to Morrie (and many others’) reminders. #reading #bookstgram #books #book #kitab #karvan #kitabikarvan #bookstagram #bookstagrammer #nonfiction #life #selfhelp #selfhelpbook #selfhelpbooks #hope #tuesdaythoughts #tuesdaypeople #tuesdaymotivation #tuesdayswithmorrie #mitchalbom #morrie #teacher #professor #lifelessons #lifelesson
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A multitude of metaphors are deployed for describing life, but rarely do we see life being seen as a lesson in itself. In an almost Kantian manner, Tuesday’s with Morrie is a beautiful book taking on life, as an end in itself. As someone on the brink of entering my late twenties, a book about life lessons by a dying professor to one of his students seems almost therapeutic...to the extent that it somehow predicates some, and probably all the errors I’ll make in life.
As lovely as the lessons delivered by Morrie in a rather matter-of-factly manner are, I’m in somewhat of a conundrum. The first thought that crossed my mind after finishing the book was that poetically human beings only appreciate lessons only after taking the fall from incorrect decisions. At least a good chunk of them do anyway. Thus, any aphorisms (the new word I picked up from the book) about life are at best an effort to blunt the impact of the mistakes we’ll inevitably make.


Personally, I’m not a fatalist or a pessimist, and I am a huge believer of books that help us improve our lives. But that being said, I stick by my original thought that often we end up making mistakes or taking decisions that strongly stand in the way dictated by these lessons. Then what role do these lessons play? I believe the lessons serve as reminders rather than guides, and prevent us from the trappings of the extremities of a pragmatic world. So yes, I’ll end up chasing a conventional career regardless of the number of people who tell me that a career won’t be what satisfies me the most. But I would like to believe that when it comes to choosing between my career and say family or friendship relations, I would always choose the latter, thanks to Morrie (and many others’) reminders.

Sunday, December 1, 2019

Everything is F*cked: A Book About Hope by Mark Manson - Kitabi Karwan Repost




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Everything is F*cked: A Book About Hope by Mark Manson Common sense, logical analysis and critical thinking are powerful tools to understand practically everything, and that’s what Mark Manson is all about. Everything is F*cked is his follow up book, and it shines just as much as the previous one, which is…not a lot. Forgive me for being counterintuitive in my method of communication (I swear it is not a pun on the books’ underlying ideas), but reading this book was a strange experience for me. I remember reading the first book during a slightly confusing and turbulent time in my life, and finding it to be one of the best books I have read in a while. I rated it a five on five and recommended it as a must-read. However, even though the content of this second book was just as…for a lack of proper word, pathbreaking, I felt let down, which got me pondering about the difference. Soon it dawned upon me that books, like us, are subject to the whims of time and context, not just of the publishing era, but also the personal environment and mindset of the reader. In retrospect, Mark Manson’s advice in both books seems nothing but an extension of what one would conclude if they simply thought logically and rationally. The problem is, the same can only be done in a good mental zone, one which is at best at a manageable level of stress or activity. Ergo, I believe this book would impact each one of you differently and leave people polarised simply because of the unique zones we’ll end up reading them in. Both of the books are not huge leaps of information or ideas or thinking for me personally. The writing style is definitely unique, eclectic and fresh, which perhaps glams up the content. But striped down to its bare content, the book suffers in multiple ways. I noticed some absurd leaps of faith as well, and also a poor understanding of deep philosophical concepts such as the writings of Kant, and a supremely biased understanding of the consequences of the upcoming AI revolution. #reading #bookstgram #books #book #kitab #karvan #kitabikarvan #bookstagram #bookstagrammer #everythingisfucked #markmanson #nonfiction #life #selfhelp #selfhelpbook #selfhelpbooks #hope
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Common sense, logical analysis and critical thinking are powerful tools to understand practically everything, and that’s what Mark Manson is all about. Everything is F*cked is his follow up book, and it shines just as much as the previous one, which is…not a lot. Forgive me for being counterintuitive in my method of communication (I swear it is not a pun on the books’ underlying ideas), but reading this book was a strange experience for me. I remember reading the first book during a slightly confusing and turbulent time in my life, and finding it to be one of the best books I have read in a while. I rated it a five on five and recommended it as a must-read. However, even though the content of this second book was just as…for a lack of proper word, pathbreaking, I felt let down, which got me pondering about the difference. Soon it dawned upon me that books, like us, are subject to the whims of time and context, not just of the publishing era, but also the personal environment and mindset of the reader. In retrospect, Mark Manson’s advice in both books seems nothing but an extension of what one would conclude if they simply thought logically and rationally. The problem is, the same can only be done in a good mental zone, one which is at best at a manageable level of stress or activity. Ergo, I believe this book would impact each one of you differently and leave people polarised simply because of the unique zones we’ll end up reading them in.
Both of the books are not huge leaps of information or ideas or thinking for me personally. The writing style is definitely unique, eclectic and fresh, which perhaps glams up the content. But striped down to its bare content, the book suffers in multiple ways. I noticed some absurd leaps of faith as well, and also a poor understanding of deep philosophical concepts such as the writings of Kant, and a supremely biased understanding of the consequences of the upcoming AI revolution.

Friday, November 29, 2019

The Prophet by Khalil Gibran - Kitabi Karwan Repost


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The Prophet by Khalil Gibran I always feel an overwhelming sense of inherent bias while reading classics. It comes from a place of self-doubt honestly - How is this book supposed to make me feel? What if I don’t like the popular lines? What if I don’t like the book? Am I the stupid one for not understanding a deeper meaning behind what appears to me to be a simple book, albeit well written? This is partly what happened to me while reading The Prophet. It’s hard to avoid the bias when you start reading a book that has been so popular, that it hasn’t been out of print in nearly the 100 years it has been in print. Simply written, the book has a plethora of beautifully written verses that’ll leave you stunned and make you grapple with pre-existing notions about certain values and emotions. Khalil Gibran explored many philosophies and religions over his lifetime, and the incoherence and lack of uniformity in his opinions reflect that. It might also help to cross relate his work with the context he would have worked i.e. the early 1900s. In a book that takes strong stands on values and virtues, it’s hard to not have polarised reactions. Your opinion would ideally jump from either ends of the spectrum, and leave you wondering about Gibran. Perhaps that’s when you ought to remind yourself, that poets, authors, and artists in general are people...just like the rest of us. Flawed, damaged and yet aspiring to be the best version of themselves. Reading this book made me experience emotions by telling me exactly what it wants me to think about it. The jury’s still out on how that model would work with individual readers, but the book contains some beautiful gems in the form of prose verses, some of which are attached to this post. #fiction #classic #classics #reading #bookstgram #books #book #kindle #ebook #kindlepaperwhite #kindlebooks #meta #germanfiction #classicfiction #kitab #karvan #kitabikarvan #bookstagram #bookstagrammer #theprophet #khalilgibran #kahlilgibran #theprophetbykahlilgibran #lebanon #poetry #prosepoetry #beauty #morals #virtue #religion
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I always feel an overwhelming sense of inherent bias while reading classics. It comes from a place of self-doubt honestly - How is this book supposed to make me feel? What if I don’t like the popular lines? What if I don’t like the book? Am I the stupid one for not understanding a deeper meaning behind what appears to me to be a simple book, albeit well written?

This is partly what happened to me while reading The Prophet. It’s hard to avoid the bias when you start reading a book that has been so popular, that it hasn’t been out of print in nearly the 100 years it has been in print. Simply written, the book has a plethora of beautifully written verses that’ll leave you stunned and make you grapple with pre-existing notions about certain values and emotions. Khalil Gibran explored many philosophies and religions over his lifetime, and the incoherence and lack of uniformity in his opinions reflect that. It might also help to cross relate his work with the context he would have worked i.e. the early 1900s.

In a book that takes strong stands on values and virtues, it’s hard to not have polarised reactions. Your opinion would ideally jump from either ends of the spectrum, and leave you wondering about Gibran. Perhaps that’s when you ought to remind yourself, that poets, authors, and artists in general are people...just like the rest of us. Flawed, damaged and yet aspiring to be the best version of themselves.

Reading this book made me experience emotions by telling me exactly what it wants me to think about it. The jury’s still out on how that model would work with individual readers, but the book contains some beautiful gems in the form of prose verses, some of which are attached to this post.