Saturday, January 18, 2020

Zero to One by Peter Thiel and Blake Mastersn- Kitabi Karwan Repost




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Zero to One by Peter Thiel and Blake Masters. The spirit of innovation is what drives the human spirit. The humdrum repetitive action of doing the exact same thing again and again might sound perfect from an automated robotic efficiency utopia’s perspective, but the fact is that being mindless drones is a thought that repulses humans at some point or the other. This is perhaps best manifested in the modern-day startup culture, with people increasingly buying into the entrepreneurial game. This is where the book steps up. Penned by a person who made a startup before it was cool to start one, it brilliantly captures the practical nuances of running an entrepreneurial ship. Peter founded Paypal with a few people, and now runs an angel investment fund, so can be reasonably be said to know a few things about running startups. Apart from giving you mantras to define your startup by, the book addresses real life situations of how and why you should structure your enterprise in a particular manner. What the book lacked for me, was something I see constantly when I read about startups - philosophy. More and more businesses are entering the field with a bare minimum idea of their end goal (if they have one at all), the ramifications of their product on the real world, and where their piece fits in the puzzle. Something that comes to mind is is the major privacy implication of Facebook or the gold mine of raw data generated by Zomato or Uber. Something that I’ll carry away from the book is this - “What important truth do very few people agree with you on?” Answer that, and you’re bound to succeed. #audiobook #audiobooks #audible #audibleindia #reading #bookstgram #books #book #kitab #karvan #kitabikarvan #bookstagram #bookstagrammer #zerotoone #peterthiel #blakemasters #startup #entrepreneur #enterprenurshipbible #paypal #founderfund #palantirtechnologies #zerotoonebook #penguinaudio #penguinbooks #penguinrandomhouseaudio
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The spirit of innovation is what drives the human spirit. The humdrum repetitive action of doing the exact same thing again and again might sound perfect from an automated robotic efficiency utopia’s perspective, but the fact is that being mindless drones is a thought that repulses humans at some point or the other. This is perhaps best manifested in the modern-day startup culture, with people increasingly buying into the entrepreneurial game.

This is where the book steps up. Penned by a person who made a startup before it was cool to start one, it brilliantly captures the practical nuances of running an entrepreneurial ship. Peter founded Paypal with a few people, and now runs an angel investment fund, so can be reasonably be said to know a few things about running startups.

Apart from giving you mantras to define your startup by, the book addresses real life situations of how and why you should structure your enterprise in a particular manner. What the book lacked for me, was something I see constantly when I read about startups - philosophy. More and more businesses are entering the field with a bare minimum idea of their end goal (if they have one at all), the ramifications of their product on the real world, and where their piece fits in the puzzle. Something that comes to mind is is the major privacy implication of Facebook or the gold mine of raw data generated by Zomato or Uber.

Something that I’ll carry away from the book is this - “What important truth do very few people agree with you on?” Answer that, and you’re bound to succeed.


Wednesday, January 15, 2020

The Red Tenda of Bologna by John Berger - Kitabi Karwan Repost




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The Red Tenda of Bologna by John Berger. Beautiful writing has no form. Over the eons, acknowledged literature has ranged from elegantly crafted haikus to verbose tales of valour running into thousands of pages. This very craft of communicating with an unique method is what has captured the interests of human beings ever since the beginning of civilisation. The Red Tenda of Bologna is an example of how succinct writing can be deeply impactful. It barely spans 50 odd pages, with some being as long as one simple sentence. In a beautiful ode to an uncle, and clearly a beloved city, Berger chooses to highlight the Red Tendas ubiquitous in the city, and serving unwittingly as a mirror to the human condition. Tightly wound, protecting the inside from the outside, yet beautifying, the Tendas are beautiful parallels to Berger’s uncle slightly unique persona. Ironically, this is one book which left me wanting for more, yet oddly satisfied. That I guess, is what Berger’s magic is. #Book #Books #Kitab #KitabiKarwan #nonfiction #reading #bookstgram #bookstagrammer #memoir #ode #bologna #travelouge #italy #italian #johnberger #tenda #redtenda #theredtendaofbologna #penguinshorts #penguinmodernclassics #penguinindia #penguinbooks
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Beautiful writing has no form. Over the eons, acknowledged literature has ranged from elegantly crafted haikus to verbose tales of valour running into thousands of pages. This very craft of communicating with an unique method is what has captured the interests of human beings ever since the beginning of civilisation. The Red Tenda of Bologna is an example of how succinct writing can be deeply impactful. It barely spans 50 odd pages, with some being as long as one simple sentence.
In a beautiful ode to an uncle, and clearly a beloved city, Berger chooses to highlight the Red Tendas ubiquitous in the city, and serving unwittingly as a mirror to the human condition. Tightly wound, protecting the inside from the outside, yet beautifying, the Tendas are beautiful parallels to Berger’s uncle slightly unique persona.
Ironically, this is one book which left me wanting for more, yet oddly satisfied. That I guess, is what Berger’s magic is.


Saturday, January 11, 2020

I Have Never Been (Un) Happier by Shaheen Bhatt - Kitabi Karwan Repost





I Have Never Been (Un) Happier by @shaheenb Honesty is often simple. It is found in unflowery language, easy yet elegant sentence structures and mostly, impassioned emotional outpouring. Talking about depression, anxiety, and/or any other mental ailments is slowly gaining grudging acceptance in an increasingly democratised online society. Yet, the taboo associated with actual conversation about the same is changing at a turtle’s pace. In that light, this book is a refreshing breath of fresh air. It makes no assertions whatsoever of offering a solution, and is by far one of the most accurate accounts of depression I have ever read (or as far as I can associate with it. Depression is notoriously different for each person who experiences it). Baring your soul in a memoir of this kind takes a special kind of courage, and at the same time, a special kind of courage to read as well. There were times when I had to put the book down because it would induce memories of darker times, memories I would rather not revisit. To that extent, I am split about whether I would want to ask people to read this book or not. But that being said, this feeling is demonstrative of the powerful writing Shaheen has demonstrated in this book. What genuinely captivated me was the much required deromanticising of mental ailments. Therapists are increasingly worried about the rather casual way in which mental health is treated by society these days, more so about how any form of sadness is self-diagnosed by individuals as depression, and used as a crutch for difficult situations. This not only devalues their own life experiences, it belittles the experiences of people who actually suffer from it. On that front too, this book is a bold step in talking about what depression actually is, and feels like. Something that particularly stood out for me was the nuance of explaining the difference between being suicidal and simply wanting to be dead. Read more in comment! #Book #Books #Kitab #KitabiKarwan #nonfiction #reading #bookstgram #bookstagrammer #mentalhealth #depression #shaheenbhatt #anxiety #memoir #penguinrandomhouseindia #penguinindia #pain #Bollywood #mentalailment #Herecomesthesun
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Honesty is often simple. It is found in unflowery language, easy yet elegant sentence structures and mostly, impassioned emotional outpouring. Talking about depression, anxiety, and/or any other mental ailments is slowly gaining grudging acceptance in an increasingly democratised online society. Yet, the taboo associated with actual conversation about the same is changing at a turtle’s pace. In that light, this book is a refreshing breath of fresh air. It makes no assertions whatsoever of offering a solution, and is by far one of the most accurate accounts of depression I have ever read (or as far as I can associate with it. Depression is notoriously different for each person who experiences it).

Baring your soul in a memoir of this kind takes a special kind of courage, and at the same time, a special kind of courage to read as well. There were times when I had to put the book down because it would induce memories of darker times, memories I would rather not revisit. To that extent, I am split about whether I would want to ask people to read this book or not. But that being said, this feeling is demonstrative of the powerful writing Shaheen has demonstrated in this book. 

What genuinely captivated me was the much required deromanticising of mental ailments. Therapists are increasingly worried about the rather casual way in which mental health is treated by society these days, more so about how any form of sadness is self-diagnosed by individuals as depression, and used as a crutch for difficult situations. This not only devalues their own life experiences, it belittles the experiences of people who actually suffer from it. On that front too, this book is a bold step in talking about what depression actually is, and feels like. Something that particularly stood out for me was the nuance of explaining the difference between being suicidal and simply wanting to be dead. Most people find it difficult to believe or understand the complex thoughts provoked by mental ailments, most of which are self-contradictory. Tackling it on head on, Shaheen manages to distill it perfectly. 

Coming back to my earlier conundrum, I think the answer is that I would end up asking people to read this book, of course, with a trigger warning. Anyone either suffering from a mental ailment will strongly associate with the book, and to the lucky ones who don’t, I suppose this book will aid you in empathising with those who do.